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Curtis Compton / AJC
Alabama coach Nick Saban didn't mind talking about Kirby Smart in the offseason.

WATCH: Nick Saban asked about Kirby Smart competition, ‘It’s not personal’

ATHENS — Alabama football Nick Saban gave no indication he had any issues with Kirby Smart when interviewed by AJC-DawgNation at the CFP press conference in San Jose, Calif., last January.

“We certainly have a lot of respect for Kirby and what he’s done at Georgia, and the very difficult games we’ve had playing them the last couple of years,” Saban said in the days leading up to the College Football Playoff Championship Game.

SEC Network host Paul Finebaum recently suggested Saban has a strained relationship with Smart, who since leaving his side as Alabama’s defensive coordinator has grown into the biggest threat to dethrone the Tide.

Smart was asked if his relationship with Saban was damaged during Georgia’s Tuesday press conference and essentially laughed it off.

RELATED: Kirby Smart discusses relationship dynamics with Saban

Saban said a lot of people confuse the competitive element with relationships.

“It’s really not personal, you still have a certain amount of respect and admiration for them as people, the kind of person they are, the kind of values they have,” Saban said. “You appreciate what they’ve done to help you be successful, and you understand what they are trying to do to be successful, and you have a respect for that, and I don’t think that’s unhealthy in any way shape or form.”

Saban used his relationship with Bill Belichick as an example, having worked as an assistant coach under Belichick with the Cleveland Browns en route to facing him from the opposite sideline in the NFL.

“We were in the same division and we played two times a year,” said Saban, who coached the Miami Dolphins in the AFC East after Belichick had become the New England Patriots coach.

“It’s not personal  …. when you compete against somebody, you want to do the best you can to try to help your team be successful and you respect them because they’re gonna do the same thing for their team.”

Saban admits it’s tough to face former assistants who know the ins and outs of his program, but he said that’s part of the coaching business.

“No doubt, they get to pick and choose which parts of what we do to utilize,” Saban said. “I did the same thing when I was coming up, whether it was George Perles at Michigan State or Bill Belichick with the Cleveland Browns.

“That’s knowledge and experience, and that’s how you gain it.”

Alabama football coach Nick Saban